Friday, April 29, 2016

Sharing a Tool - And Why I'm Worried About It

To Share or Not to Share

An Attractive Tool for Creating Digital Worksheets

Lately there is a movement not to promote tools that aren't deep in pedagogy and critical thinking. It seems that as technology integrators we are to share tools and strategies that are strong in the SAMR model or promote the most cutting edge movements in education.  Gone are the days of 60 sites in 60 minutes or Top 10 sites for creating . . .

What I'm going to share today isn't cutting edge. It is at the substitution level of SAMR. I doesn't necessarily involve critical thinking, yet I really like this tool and I'm confident that teachers and students will like it as well.

The site is called Wizer.me and it is used to create a digital worksheet. Wizer.me can also be used for formative assessments. A teacher can create their own worksheet or they can explore the hundreds of already created worksheets and use them. Here is the link to a worksheet I found while browsing on rock cycles.

Here is the link to a worksheet I created on state regions.

What I like about Wizer.me is that 
  • it is visually pleasing - there are many design choices
  • it has different options for activities (fill in the blanks, matching etc.)
  •  there is a share to Google Classroom option
  • the access to the worksheet can be turned on and off
  • each student worksheet is viewable when completed with an overall score
  • teachers can share their worksheet with colleagues


What do you think? Should I worry about blogging about and sharing sites like Wizer.me just because they aren't advanced and don't lend well to higher order thinking?  When presenting at conferences, I believe it is sites such as Wizer.me that are still the types of technology that teachers are looking for. This tool is simple to use, applicable to any content area or age level, and helpful for assessments.

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